Climate action | The Changing Childhood Project | UNICEF x Gallup

Climate Change

Climate action

Devastation wrought by the climate crisis is all around us. Some governments, companies, and individuals are ramping up efforts to mitigate its effects. Will it be enough?

We conducted a survey among 15–24 and 40+ year-olds across 21 countries to explore how childhood is changing.

Read more about the survey
Do you think humans can reduce most of the effects of climate change?

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On average, an overwhelming 86% of young people believe humans can still act to reduce most of the devastating effects of climate change. They have hope!

Do you think your government should take significant action to address climate change?

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On average, 73% of young people say their government should take significant action.

% of young people who support bold government action on climate change
Low/Lower-middle income countries
83%
Upper-middle income countries
66%
High-income countries
70%

We found the strongest support among young people for government action on climate change in poorer countries.

That’s telling, as these countries are least equipped to respond to the climate crisis, and yet are most exposed to its effects.

Surprisingly, we found no significant generational gap in these views: Older people are equally likely to believe the worst effects of climate change can be stopped and that bold government action is needed.

One area where we did see a generational divide: whether countries should cooperate when it comes to tackling major global challenges.

More 15-24 year-olds say their country would be safer if their governments worked with othersMore 40+ year-olds say their country would be safer if their governments worked with others
BangladeshIndonesiaMaliNigeriaUSA

Here young people are more supportive of national governments working together than on their own.

This is especially true in Indonesia, the United States, Nigeria, Bangladesh and Mali.